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Oct 28-31, 2024

 

A virtual event on

R/Evolutions in MEEG research practices

About

CuttingEEG is turning 10 years old! This milestone calls for a special edition, looking back at the EEG and MEG fields of the past 10 years and looking ahead at the next 10 years and beyond!

When? October 28th – October 31st, 2024

Where? This will be primarily an online event, much like LiveMEEG 2020. However, if you’d prefer an in-person experience, the last two days (October 30-31) will be broadcasted live from the Donders Institute auditorium in Nijmegen with limited seating (around 100 seats). Learn more about it

What? This edition is inviting the CuttingEEG community to take a step back and reflect on the role of M/EEG in cognitive and clinical neuroscience as well as in society at large. Our own critical view on recent and foreseeable developments and evolutions, our role as scientists in this field, with ethical, societal, and environmental considerations.

Sessions

R/Evolutions in M/EEG research practices

 

Evolving methods

Exploring selected trends of the past 10 years, from machine learning to computational models and more…

Evolving devices

Examining ongoing and upcoming technological advances: Mobile Imaging with MEG and EEG among others.

Evolving oscillations

Discussing current controversies on the reality of oscillations as measured with M/EEG.

Evolving goals

Investigating the incentives and long-term goals of scientific research.

Evolving society

Considering the causes and consequences of neuroscience research.

Evolving neuroscience

Causes and Consequences beyond electrophysiological observation

Evolving computational tools

Highlighting developments in big data handling and cloud computing.

Evolving publications

Analyzing changing article types, publication models, and research practices.

Program

Monday 28 October

14:00 (Paris) / 9:00 (NYC)

CuttingEEGX Introduction, 10 years of Cutting-edge EEG and MEG!

Time

Title

More..

Evolving Methods

Exploring selected trends of the past 10 years, from statistical to machine learning approaches

14:20 (Paris) / 9:20 (NYC)

Regression: Emergence of mixed models, what they solve, and why

Benedikt Ehinger

TBA

14:40 (Paris) / 9:40 (NYC)

Break

14:50 (Paris) / 9:50 (NYC)

Decoding the electro-magnetic signals of the brain: the progress and challenges of deep learning

Jean-Rémi King

TBA

15:10 (Paris) / 10:10 (NYC)

Round Table

Evolving Devices

Examining ongoing and upcoming technological advances: Mobile Imaging with MEG and EEG among others.

16:00 (Paris) / 11:00 (NYC)

Opportunities and challenges with OPM-based MEG

Yulia Bezsudnova

TBA

16:20 (Paris) / 11:20 (NYC)

EEG from the ear: challenges, state-of-the-art and observable phenomena

Preben Kidmose

TBA

16:40 (Paris) / 11:40 (NYC)

Break

16:50 (Paris) / 11:50 (NYC)

Mobile Brain imaging

Stefan Debener

All humans make mistakes, and neuroscientists are no exception. We need to understand and watch out for common fallacies in reasoning in order to avoid them in neuroscience research, just as in everyday life. My talk will focus on a few fallacies that are common in some kinds of neuroscience research, including EEG, and illustrate these fallacies with real examples.

17:10 (Paris) / 12:10 (NYC)

Round Table

Tuesday 29 October

Time

Title

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Evolving Oscillations

Discussing current controversies on the reality of oscillations.

14:00 (Paris) / 9:00 (NYC)

Oscillations, are they real?

Saskia Haegens

TBA

14:20 (Paris) / 9:20 (NYC)

Waves beyond waveforms: (mis)interpretation of EEG in cognitive neuroscience

Tzvetan Popov

An axiomatic view in contemporary neuroscience is that, under well-controlled experimental conditions, event-induced potentials and oscillations vary with task-specific cognitive demands and reflect the neural support of the cognitive operation performed.

A complementary view is discussed based on the premise that brain rhythms evolved to control the movement of the brain’s sensors and to register the consequences of this movement. This control of behavior is a species-independent necessity and a key survival requirement for all organisms equipped with and relying on the ability to explore the environment. Consequently, brain rhythms appear correlated with the cognitive task at hand, while they evolved primarily to support action. A series of results will be discussed that challenge the prevailing premise and support the conclusion that EEG components derived from electrophysiology appear to “underpin” cognition when they primarily reflect the potentiality and manifestation of oculomotor action, a requirement in all experimental examinations of human cognition. Waves, beyond mere waveforms, enable collective behavior across various organizational scales, ranging from neurons to animal societies.

14:40 (Paris) / 9:40 (NYC)

Break

14:50 (Paris) / 9:50 (NYC)

Sensorimotor beta activity - neural mechanisms and changes post-stroke

Catharina Zich

Stroke is a leading cause of complex adult disability, but currently, we do not know when and how to drive recovery optimally. To address this, we relate clinical measures to brain function and brain structure in the acute stage post-stroke. We found that brain structure relates to initial impairment, while brain function (sensorimotor β activity) predicts subsequent recovery. 

To further understand the role of sensorimotor beta activity, we dissected transient beta burst events in high signal-to-noise MEG data from healthy individuals. We quantified the temporal, spectral, and spatial domain of sensorimotor beta bursts and found that they occur in planar spatiotemporal wave-like patterns. The propagation of the waves is along two axes, parallel or perpendicular to the central sulcus, which are characterised by distinct anatomical and physiological features.

15:10 (Paris) / 10:10 (NYC)

Round Table

Evolving Neuroscience

Causes and Consequences beyond neurophysiological observation

16:00 (Paris) / 11:00 (NYC)

TBA

TBA

TBA

16:20 (Paris) / 11:20 (NYC)

What is it like to be a signal ?

Laurent Vercueil

TBA

16:40 (Paris) / 11:40 (NYC)

Break

16:50 (Paris) / 11:50 (NYC)

Round table: Careers in and out of academia

Testimonies of  MEG/EEG PhDs

Where to settle with a PhD in MEG/EEG research? This session will feature a bunch of people who once stepped out of the academic system. What are they doing now? How do they consider their experience as researchers in retrospect?

Wednesday 30 October

Time

Title

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Evolving Society

Present societal challenges and the future of M/EEG neuroscience

14:00 (Paris) / 9:00 (NYC)

Sustainability of M/EEG Neuroscience research

Anne Urai

TBA

14:20 (Paris) / 9:20 (NYC)

What neuroscience in the anthropocene era ?

Daniele Schön, Julien Lefèvre, Manuel Mercier

TBA

14:40 (Paris) / 9:40 (NYC)

Break

14:50 (Paris) / 9:50 (NYC)

A queer and science fiction look at neuroscience

Saul Pandelakis

TBA

15:10 (Paris) / 10:10 (NYC)

Round Table: M/EEG neuroscience in the face of uncertain futures.

Evolving Goals

Investigating the incentives and long-term goals of scientific research.

16:00 (Paris) / 11:00 (NYC)

Open source software: Cycling on the freeway

Britta Westner

TBA

16:20 (Paris) / 11:20 (NYC)

Modern approaches for research assessment

TBA

TBA

16:40 (Paris) / 11:40 (NYC)

Break

16:50 (Paris) / 11:50 (NYC)

100 years of EEG: the EEG100 questionnaire and its aftermath

Faisal Mushtaq, Dominik Welke,Maximilen Chaumon, Alexandra Corneyllie

TBA

17:10 (Paris) / 12:10 (NYC)

Round Table

Thursday 31 October

Time

Title

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Evolving Publications

Changing article types, publication models, and research practices.

14:00 (Paris) / 9:00 (NYC)

Can we trust publications that we cannot reproduce?

Katherine Button

TBA

14:20 (Paris) / 9:20 (NYC)

Ethical publishing and evolving publication pratices

Birte Forstmann

TBA

14:40 (Paris) / 9:40 (NYC)

Break

14:50 (Paris) / 9:50 (NYC)

Scientific integrity, plagiarism and fraud

Vanja Pupovac

TBA

15:10 (Paris) / 10:10 (NYC)

Round Table

Evolving Computational Tools

Highlighting developments in big data handling and cloud computing.

16:00 (Paris) / 11:00 (NYC)

Cloud computing for M/EEG neuroscience data using the Brainlife platform

Guiomar Niso

TBA

16:20 (Paris) / 11:20 (NYC)

AI-guided data analysis: hype or hope?

Eugenia Stamboliev

TBA

16:40 (Paris) / 11:40 (NYC)

Break

16:50 (Paris) / 11:50 (NYC)

Round Table

17:20 (Paris) / 12:20 (NYC)

Closing remarks / Past and Future of CuttingEEG

Organizing team

Maximilien Chaumon

CENIR, ICM, CNRS, France

Alexandra Corneyllie

CRNL, CNRS, France

Anne-Sophie Dubarry

CRPN-AMU, France

Robert Oostenveld

DCCN, The Netherlands

Anaïs Llorens

FEMTO-ST & IPNP, France

Britta Westner

DCCN, The Netherlands

Christelle Zielinski

LPL, France

Julia Chauvet

MPI, The Netherlands

Adrien Schramm

Independent Event Organiser